How to Install a CPU | 8 Steps Guide

How to Install a CPU
How to Install a CPU

The central processing unit (CPU) is the electrical circuitry that performs the instructions that make up a computer program. The CPU executes simple arithmetic, logic, power, and input/output operations directed by the program’s instructions. A processor’s primary functions are to retrieve, decode, execute, and write back. 

Fetch is a machine RAM operation that accepts instructions from program memory. The place where the action is carried out is called Execute. To carry out each part of the CPU that is required is triggered. Installing a CPU, like many other facets of PC construction, is a basic procedure. But there’s no need to be concerned about making a mistake because we’ll walk you through each stage. if you want to buy a new processer here is our complete guide on how to choose cpu.

How to Install a CPU | The Ultimate Guide

Installing a CPU, like many other facets of PC construction, is a basic procedure. But there’s no need to be concerned about making a mistake because we’ll guide you through each stage.

1. Locate the CPU Socket

To begin, locate the CPU socket on your motherboard. You won’t be able to skip it if you aim for the big square socket with a small metal lever in the center of your motherboard. For the next few years, this is where your trusty new CPU will happily live (well, hopefully). The sockets for Intel and AMD are subtly different, as you’ll see below, but they’re in the same place.

Locate the CPU Socket
Locate the CPU Socket

2. Open the CPU Socket

First, to access the CPU socket on the motherboard, remove the retention arm (the small metal lever on the side of the socket). Pull the retaining arm out to the right (away from the socket) to unlock it and allow it to be raised. Lift the arm to its full height, then remove the socket cover. Covers are only used on Intel CPU sockets; AMD sockets do not.

There is a little retaining arm to raise out to the side and then up while mounting AMD CPUs (AM4 port), but no socket cover to open. Instead, as you raise the retention arm to a 90-degree angle, the center of the socket immediately opens up to reveal the middle. AMD sockets do not have covers, unlike Intel sockets. If you’re curious, this is because Intel CPUs have touch pins on the motherboard, while AMD CPUs have contact pins on the CPU itself. 

Open the CPU Socket
Open the CPU Socket

3: Line Up The Notches Or Triangle On The Processor With The Socket

You may have multiple notches along the edges or a little triangle in one corner, depending on the processor and socket you’re using. Fortunately, the CPU and socket almost all have markers that help you get the alignment correct.

On the apex of your CPU and the port, look for a similar symbol. It’ll probably look like a little triangle. If you don’t see it, check the manuals for your motherboard and processor. These instructions are intended to help you mount your CPU in the proper place.

Line up the notches or triangle on the processor with the socket
Line up the notches or triangle on the processor with the socket

4: Gently Lay The Processor Into The Socket

After you’ve double-checked that the processor is oriented properly, kindly insert it in the socket. Should not insert it at an angle. It’s safer just to hit the sides of the CPU while holding it. Touching the underside of the metal lid will leave behind unwanted debris that can impede results. The processor should never have to be forced into place. If you exert too much pressure, the pins will bend or break, making the processor useless.

Gently lay the processor into the socket
Gently lay the processor into the socket

5: Relatch The Socket Cover

Close the socket cover over the processor and tighten it so that it is safely fixed in place until it has been properly inserted. If the retention arm seems to be fighting you, double-check the CPU’s seating in the socket. We’ve found that a soft push with your pinky finger is enough to close the retention arm, so don’t push too hard, or you’ll damage your CPU.

Relatch the socket cover
Relatch the socket cover

6: Apply Thermal Paste To The Processor

Add a thin coat of thermal paste to the top of the CPU before mounting the CPU cooler by eliminating any imperfections on the touch surfaces, this aids in the heat transfer from the processor to the CPU cooler.

Apply thermal paste to the processor.
Apply thermal paste to the processor.

7. Secure The CPU Cooler

Depending on the kind of cooler you’re mounting, this procedure may differ. Stock Intel coolers use four prongs to attach to the motherboard, while stock AMD coolers are mounted at an angle in metal tabs. Make sure your CPU cooler is connected to your motherboard’s CPU FAN socket. It will drive the cooler’s fan.

Secure the CPU cooler
Secure the CPU cooler

8. Close Up Your System

Return the side panel to its original position. Protect it with screws. Attach all of the cables to the back of your machine and place them back at your desk.

Close up your system
Close up your system

How To Replace The Old CPU

Replacement to the processor is one of the most costly upgrades you can make, resulting in significant performance gains. Before buying a processor upgrade, make sure you know what kinds of processors are compatible.

For replacing the old processor, you should note some important features that are described below:

a. Find Your Motherboard Documentation

The socket style of your motherboard is the most important aspect in determining what processor you should install. AMD and Intel have separate connectors, and both companies use various kinds of sockets based on the chip they’re using. The required socket details can find in your motherboard’s documents.

b. To Decide Your Socket Type, Use The CPU-Z Program

CPU-Z is a freeware program that will tell you what kind of hardware you have built on your computer. It is the most user-friendly application for determining the motherboard socket type.

From www.cpuid.com, download and install CPU-Z.

Run the CPU-Z program.

Notice what is shown in the “Package” area when you click the “CPU” button.

c. If You Can’t Find Your Old CPU, Take It To A Computer Shop

Remove your old processor from the motherboard and take it to a tech specialty store if you somehow can’t figure out the socket kind. One of the technicians should tell you what socket type you have and maybe suggest any processors that would be suitable substitutes.

d. Consider Purchasing A New Motherboard If You Want To Upgrade/ Replace

If you’re trying to replace a processor in an older machine with a newer one, the sockets might not be compatible. Obtaining a new processor that can work on an aging motherboard becomes more problematic as time passes. It would be much better if you purchase a new motherboard along with your new CPU.

Remove The Old Processor

After checking the motherboard compatibility, the next step is to remove the old processor working well and give up the poor performance. These are the following steps describes in detail that will help you to remove the old processor.

1. Remove The Lid From Your Computer Cover

It would help if you first opened your case to gain access to your CPU. Unplug all of the wires and switch off the screen. Place the machine on its side, with the back connectors facing the table. Using a Phillips screwdriver or the thumbscrews, remove the side plate.

2. Track Down The CPU Cooler

A CPU cooler will be mounted on the top of almost all processors. It is typically a metal heat sink with a built-in fan. To gain access to the CPU, you must first delete this. 

3. Remove Any Cables Or Components That Are Obstructing Your Access

A computer’s interior may be a crowded place, and cables or other elements could be covering some or more of the CPU cooler. Remove everything you need to access it, but keep track of where you plugged it in.

4. Remove The CPU Cooler

Remove the cooler from the motherboard by unplugging it and then detaching it. The four prongs on most stock coolers can be undone with your fingers or a flathead screwdriver. Must remove first A bracket on the back of the motherboard for certain CPU coolers.

Because of the thermal paste, the cooler will most likely remain stuck to the processor after being removed from the motherboard. To delete the processor’s heat sink, gently twist it back and forth. If you’re going to reuse the CPU cooler on the new chip, clean the bottom of the cooler with rubbing alcohol to remove any leftover thermal paste.

5. Remove The Side Lever On The CPU Socket Cover

First, to access the CPU socket on the motherboard, remove the retention arm (the small metal lever on the socket side). Pull the retaining arm out to the right (away from the socket) to unlock it and allow it to be raised. Lift the arm to its full height, then remove the socket cover. Covers are only used on Intel CPU sockets; AMD sockets do not.

6. Lift The CPU Right Out With A Gentle Lift

Grip the CPU on the sides and raise the CPU straight up to avoid damaging any fragile pins. To get the processor out from under the socket cover, you will need to tilt it slightly, but make sure you are clear of the pins first.

If you want to save your old CPU, put it in an antistatic bag. If you’re storing an AMD CPU, try to push it into antistatic foam as well to save the pins from being damaged.

Installation of New Processor

The good news is that switching out a CPU is relatively simple if you have all of the necessary knowledge and resources. In reality, you’re likely to spend more time preparing for the process than you are updating the processor. For the installation of a CPU, please follow all the steps described in part 1 in detail for your proper guidance.

Conclusion  

That’s it! Your CPU installation is complete! It’s easy to do and difficult to mess up if you take your time to make sure you grasp each move before you start. It must be noted that since updating the CPU, there’s no reason you should have to reinstall Windows. Normally, you’d have to do something was replaced the HDD. Other modules need new drivers, but this does not necessitate a fresh OS installation.

You won’t be able to insert the CPU into the motherboard unless you use a lot of force if the CPU is rotated in the wrong direction. The CPU can fall into position without any effort. The pins on the CPU lead directly to the motherboard sockets; if the CPU is rotated in the wrong direction, it will not drop into place.

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My name is Muhammad Nadeem. Just complete my graduation in computer science. I love to play games. I am working as a computer hardware seller in the offline and online marketplace.